Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening: How I Learned the Unexpected Joy of a Green Thumb and an Open Heart
Description
Carol Wall, a white woman living in a lily-white neighbourhood in Middle America, was at a crossroads in her life. Her children were grown; she had successfully overcome illness; her beloved parents were getting older. One day she notices a dark-skinned African man tending her neighbour's yard. His name is Giles Owita. He bags groceries at the supermarket. He comes from Kenya. And he’s very good at gardening
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Strategy for Facilitating Conversations on Race
Description
Facilitating conversations about race often involves tension, as both the facilitators and participants bring emotional experiences and their deeply held values and beliefs into the room. Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: Strategies for Facilitating Conversations on Race guides facilitators through a process of becoming comfortable with the discomfort in leading conversations about racism, privilege and power.
Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And other Conversations About Race
Description
Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides
Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race
Description
A guide for facilitating and participating in difficult dialogues about race, author Derald Wing Sue – an internationally recognized expert on multiculturalism, diversity, and microaggressions – explores the characteristics, dynamics, and meaning behind discussions about race as well as the hidden "ground rules" that inhibit honest and productive dialogue.

Being White in the Helping Professions: Developing Effective Intercultural Awareness

Description
In this reflective yet practical book, the author challenges white helping professionals to recognize their own cultural identity and the impact it has when practising in a multicultural environment.Judy Ryde reveals how white people have implicit and explicit advantages and privileges that often go unnoticed by them. . She explores whether it is possible to talk about a white identity, addresses uncomfortable feelings such as guilt or shame.

Race(ing) Intercultural Communication

Description
Race(ing) Intercultural Communication signals a crucial intervention in the field, as well as in wider society, where social and political events are calling for new ways of making sense of race in the 21st century. Contributors to this book work at multiple intersections, theoretically and methodologically, in order to highlight relational (im)possibilities for intercultural communication. Chapters underscore the continuing importance of studying race, and the diverse mechanisms that maintain racial logics both in the U. S. and globally. In the so-called ‘post-racial’ era in which we live, not only are disrupting notions of colour-blindness crucially important, but so too are imagining new ways of thinking through racial matters.

Race Discrimination and Management of Ethnic Diversity and Migration at Work: European Countries' Perspectives (International Perspectives on Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Book 6)

Description
Race Discrimination and Management of Ethnic Diversity and Migration at Work analyses perspectives from nine countries: France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Italy, Cyprus and Greece. Each country-focused chapter examines the historical context surrounding diversity, equality, racism and discrimination, along with facts and statistics about ethnicity in society and at work. Chapters then investigate the discourse and measures deployed at the national and organisational levels to combat race discrimination and their effects, and each provides a country-specific case study. The book concludes with a reflection on the development of equality legislation in the EU and its impact on racial equality at the workplace.

Public Medievalists, Racism, and Suffrage in the American Women’s College

Description
This study, part of growing interest in the study of nineteenth-century medievalism and Anglo-Saxonism, closely examines the intersections of race, class, and gender in the teaching of Anglo-Saxon in the American women’s colleges before World War I, interrogating the ways that the positioning of Anglo-Saxon as the historical core of the collegiate English curriculum also silently perpetuated mythologies about Manifest Destiny, male superiority, and the primacy of northern European ancestry in United States culture at large. Analysis of college curricula and biographies of female professors demonstrates the ways that women used Anglo-Saxon as a means to professional opportunity and political expression, especially in the suffrage movement, even as that legitimacy and respectability was freighted with largely unarticulated assumptions of racist and sexist privilege. The study concludes by connecting this historical analysis with current charged discussions about the intersections of race, class, and gender on college campuses and throughout US culture.

Black in Place: The Spatial Aesthetics of Race in a Post-Chocolate City

Description
While Washington, D.C., is still often referred to as "Chocolate City," it has undergone significant demographic, political, and economic change in the last decade. In D.C., no place represents this shift better than the H Street corridor. In this book, Brandi Thompson Summers documents D.C.'s shift to a "post-chocolate" cosmopolitan metropolis by charting H Street's economic and racial developments. In doing so, she offers a theoretical framework for understanding how blackness is aestheticized and deployed to organize landscapes and raise capital. Summers focuses on the continuing significance of blackness in a place like the nation's capital, how blackness contributes to our understanding of contemporary urbanization, and how it laid an important foundation for how Black people have been thought to exist in cities. Summers also analyzes how blackness—as a representation of diversity—is marketed to sell a progressive, "cool," and authentic experience of being in and moving through an urban center.

Supporting People Living with Dementia in Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Communities: Key Issues and Strategies for Change

Description
Focusing on individual Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities such as Irish, Caribbean, South Asian, Chinese and Jewish, this accessible guide brings together key information on the impact of living with dementia in BAME communities into a single comprehensive resource for front-line staff as well as an information source for families and carers. The book sets out personal case studies and examines how to provide bespoke support and information to raise awareness and lower levels of stigma. With diagnoses among minority communities set to increase, this much-needed handbook is the perfect companion for care home workers, social workers, doctors and nurses who may lack experience in communicating with and caring for people from BAME backgrounds. It is also a valuable resource for family carers and those living with dementia.

Race, Organizations, and the Organizing Process

Description
There have been few efforts to conceive of race as a characteristic that organizations possess or at the very least a characteristic that exists at the institutional level with which organizations must contend. In the United States especially, this belies our history of marking organizations and organizational practices as "Black" or "White", essentially "racing" organizations. Despite the undoing of legally sanctioned racial segregation, we continue to use such demarcations to classify organizations as Black colleges or Black media companies.